VHS & DVD

Evolution Box Set on DVD

A PBS documentary
WGBH Boston, 2001. 480 minutes.

A wonderful documentary, beautifully rendered on DVD, highlighting many key areas of evolution, including its history, modern theory, and its implications. Evolution also features many NCSE supporters and staff members. A must for individuals, students, teachers and professors alike!

Evolution Box Set on VHS

A PBS documentary
WGBH Boston, 2001. 420 minutes.

A wonderful documentary highlighting many key areas of evolution, including its history, modern theory, and its implications. Evolution also features many NCSE supporters and staff members. A must for individuals, students, teachers and professors alike!

Flock of Dodos

Directed by Randy Olson
New Video Group, 2007. 85 minutes.

A hilarious documentary that examines both sides of the controversy over the teaching of "intelligent design" in public schools, centering on the fight over the place of evolution in Kansas's state science standards. Variety described Flock of Dodos as "intelligently designed for popular appeal," and NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott praised it as "a powerful defense of evolution that needs to be seen by every teacher of science." The home version includes 84 minutes of bonus features, including unused clips of a mock debate between "the world's most obsfuscating intelligent designer, Dr. Edward Sheehee, and the world's angriest evolutionist, Dr. Jonathan Girr."

Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial

A NOVA documentary
WGBH Boston, 2008. 112 minutes.

A Peabody-award-winning documentary about Kitzmiller v. Dover, the 2005 case that established the unconstitutionality of teaching "intelligent design" creationism in the public schools. "Judgment Day gracefully avoids ridiculing intelligent design for the pseudo-intellectual fundamentalist fig-leaf that it is, by simply showing how the protagonists shot themselves in the foot," wrote the reviewer for Nature, adding, "Judgment Day is just the sort of thoughtful programming that celebrates how sensible people — faithful and otherwise — can use science and reason to combat fundamentalism."