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The latest poll on climate change

UTEP logoMore than three quarters of the American public accepts the reality of global climate change, according to a new poll. In the latest University of Texas at Austin Energy poll (PDF), 76% of respondents agreed that global climate change is occurring, while 14% disagreed and 10% were not sure.

"Teaching the truth about climate change"

New York Times logoObserving that "[m]isinformation about climate change is distressingly common in the United States," The New York Times called for teaching students about climate change in its October 10, 2015, editorial. 

Polling scientists on climate change

"Using responses from nearly 700 biophysical scientists," a new survey "finds that approximately 92 percent of them believe that human-caused climate change is really happening," according to the Washington Post (September 25, 2015), reporting on J. S. Carlton, Rebecca Perry-Hill, Matthew Huber, and Linda S. Prokopy's "The climate change consensus extends beyond climate scientists," published in Environmental Research Letters.

A new poll on climate change

AP and NORC logos

A new poll on public attitudes toward Pope Francis's encyclical on climate change included questions on the occurrence of climate change itself. Asked "Do you think that global warming is happening, or do you think global warming is not happening?" 69% of respondents said yes, 16% said no, 15% said that they were not sure, and 1% skipped or refused to answer the question. 

Polling Latinos on climate change

A new poll of Latinos in the United States finds that a large majority — more than four fifths — accept that climate change is real, and that a majority — almost two thirds — accept that climate change is mostly due to human activity.

No Senate resolution on climate education

Edward MarkeyEdward Markey

When the United States Senate passed the Every Child Achieves Act of 2015 on July 16, 2015, a proposed resolution acknowledging the scientific evidence for climate change and affirming the importance of climate science education was not included.

Update from the Senate

Seal of the United States SenateTwo of the three amendments concerning climate change education under consideration are out of commission as the United States Senate continues to discuss a bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

Climate change education in the Senate

Seal of the United States SenateClimate change education is suddenly under discussion in the United States Senate, the National Journal (July 9, 2015) reports, with the introduction of dueling amendments to a bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

A new poll on dinosaur/human coexistence

Prompted by the release of the movie Jurassic World, a new poll from YouGov indicates that Americans are about evenly split on the question of whether dinosaurs and humans lived on the planet at the same time.

Darwin Day resolution in the Senate

Richard BlumenthalRichard Blumenthal

Senate Resolution 66 (PDF), introduced in the United States Senate on February 4, 2015, would, if passed, express the Senate's support of designating February 12, 2015, as Darwin Day, and its recognition of "Charles Darwin as a worthy symbol on which to celebrate the achievements of reason, science, and the advancement of human knowledge."


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